Quaint Notion

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From a distance, at a time of urbanization and connectivity, rodeo and ranching may seem anachronistic notions - quaint and sepia-toned from an America that no longer exists. Such a quaint notion to see Morningstar Road so quiet. Then again, this photo was taken in 1928. By 1935, there was suddenly a. Big old Bayonne Bridge standing proudly behind the station. Again, Morningstar Road with no traffic? A 1935 view of the original Elm Park station. From the Bayonne Bridge pedestrian walk. Some of the customs can seem as quaint as the people the quaint customs that govern relations between the banks.the quaint old notion that crime doesn't pay there's something rather quaint about her judges are seen as quaint, Victorian and out of touch she was a quaint figure in her white cap and her dress of rough brown wool, the generous folds of which couldn't quite disguise the.

December 21, 2018

Gridlock is a necessary evil in any government system with checks and balances. It can nevertheless lead to despotism when government shutdowns are used to coerce representatives of vulnerable states into funding programs that grow the government. This form of extortion is possible because a third of all U.S. land is federal property.

Quaint

Quaint Notion 意思

Territories that became states in the first half of the 19th century usually acquired nearly all lands that were previously under federal jurisdiction. This changed after environmentalists persuaded Congress to retain lands for both their natural resources and scenic beauty. This is why the largest expanses of federal land are in western states like Wyoming (48%), Oregon (53%), Alaska (61%), Idaho (62%), Utah (65%), and Nevada (85%). East of the Mississippi, average federal land ownership is only 4%. Nearly all these eastern states were consolidated prior to 1850.

The first national park was created by an act of Congress in 1872, and in 1906, Theodore Roosevelt asserted his new authority under the 'American Antiquities Act' by designating 18 national monuments. By the time President Carter signed the 'Federal Land Policy and Management Act' in 1976, over a hundred more national monuments had been declared. Rural Westerners who relied on federal lands to make a living chafed under the new FLPMA mandates and launched the 'Sagebrush Rebellion.' Ronald Reagan was sympathetic to their cause. As president, he appointed one of these 'rebels' as secretary of the interior and implemented the 'Good Neighbor Policy.' This lifted many of the restrictions imposed by Carter and gave locals more say in how the land would be used.

Article 1 of the Constitution relegates federal property to 'Forts, Magazines, Arsenals, Dock-Yards, and other needful Buildings.' While a case can be made for setting aside small areas of public land of historic significance, the Framers would have regarded the actions of presidents like Roosevelt, Carter, and later Obama (who designated more national monuments than any other president) as federal overreach.

overwhelmingly rejected

This passageEnvironmentalists who shudder at the notion of turning over national parks to states overlook the role of state and regional parks in preserving our natural heritage. How many visitors to Anastasia believe that these Florida state parks would be better off under federal jurisdiction? These habitats not only protect wildlife, they also attract visitors from out of state that patronize local businesses. Any governor who proposes opening them to development would be run out of town on a rail.

There have been over a dozen government shutdowns since the Carter administration but most were barely noticed outside the Beltway because presidents worked hard to lessen their impact. In stark contrast, Obama weaponized the 2013 shutdown to show all Americans how much they 'needed' Washington. Consequently, National Park Service employees were ordered to go out of their way to barricade national monuments and inflict 'as much pain as possible' on Americans. In Yellowstone National Park, an overzealous ranger even ordered a group of elderly tourists back into a tour bus to stop them from taking pictures.

that he eventually resigned. James Watt (Zinke's predecessor under Reagan) also served only two years. He resignedraison d'être because people who believe in limited government are more inclined to ask why some of these agencies are even necessary.

The 2013 shutdown shows us the “noble” intentions in 1872 and 1906 now serve as a means to extort concessions from states whose residents who are not on the same page as their D.C. overlords. Ronald Reagan was unhappy with the resignation of James Watt. He may have been thinking about the ruling class that drummed out his Secretary of the Interior when he said, “Tyranny, like fog in a well-known poem, often creeps in silently on little cat feet”.

Gridlock is a necessary evil in any government system with checks and balances. It can nevertheless lead to despotism when government shutdowns are used to coerce representatives of vulnerable states into funding programs that grow the government. This form of extortion is possible because a third of all U.S. land is federal property.

Territories that became states in the first half of the 19th century usually acquired nearly all lands that were previously under federal jurisdiction. This changed after environmentalists persuaded Congress to retain lands for both their natural resources and scenic beauty. This is why the largest expanses of federal land are in western states like Wyoming (48%), Oregon (53%), Alaska (61%), Idaho (62%), Utah (65%), and Nevada (85%). East of the Mississippi, average federal land ownership is only 4%. Nearly all these eastern states were consolidated prior to 1850.

The first national park was created by an act of Congress in 1872, and in 1906, Theodore Roosevelt asserted his new authority under the 'American Antiquities Act' by designating 18 national monuments. By the time President Carter signed the 'Federal Land Policy and Management Act' in 1976, over a hundred more national monuments had been declared. Rural Westerners who relied on federal lands to make a living chafed under the new FLPMA mandates and launched the 'Sagebrush Rebellion.' Ronald Reagan was sympathetic to their cause. As president, he appointed one of these 'rebels' as secretary of the interior and implemented the 'Good Neighbor Policy.' This lifted many of the restrictions imposed by Carter and gave locals more say in how the land would be used.

Quaint

Article 1 of the Constitution relegates federal property to 'Forts, Magazines, Arsenals, Dock-Yards, and other needful Buildings.' While a case can be made for setting aside small areas of public land of historic significance, the Framers would have regarded the actions of presidents like Roosevelt, Carter, and later Obama (who designated more national monuments than any other president) as federal overreach.

overwhelmingly rejected

This passageEnvironmentalists who shudder at the notion of turning over national parks to states overlook the role of state and regional parks in preserving our natural heritage. How many visitors to Anastasia believe that these Florida state parks would be better off under federal jurisdiction? These habitats not only protect wildlife, they also attract visitors from out of state that patronize local businesses. Any governor who proposes opening them to development would be run out of town on a rail.

There have been over a dozen government shutdowns since the Carter administration but most were barely noticed outside the Beltway because presidents worked hard to lessen their impact. In stark contrast, Obama weaponized the 2013 shutdown to show all Americans how much they 'needed' Washington. Consequently, National Park Service employees were ordered to go out of their way to barricade national monuments and inflict 'as much pain as possible' on Americans. In Yellowstone National Park, an overzealous ranger even ordered a group of elderly tourists back into a tour bus to stop them from taking pictures.

that he eventually resigned. James Watt (Zinke's predecessor under Reagan) also served only two years. He resignedraison d'être because people who believe in limited government are more inclined to ask why some of these agencies are even necessary.

The 2013 shutdown shows us the “noble” intentions in 1872 and 1906 now serve as a means to extort concessions from states whose residents who are not on the same page as their D.C. overlords. Ronald Reagan was unhappy with the resignation of James Watt. He may have been thinking about the ruling class that drummed out his Secretary of the Interior when he said, “Tyranny, like fog in a well-known poem, often creeps in silently on little cat feet”.


Also found in: Thesaurus, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

quaint

(kwānt)adj.quaint·er, quaint·est
1. Charmingly odd, especially in an old-fashioned way: 'Sarah Orne Jewett ... was dismissed by one critic as merely a New England old maid who wrote quaint, plotless sketches of late 19th-century coastal Maine'(James McManus).
2. Archaic Unfamiliar or unusual in character; strange: quaint dialect words.
[Middle English queinte, cointe, clever, cunning, peculiar, from Old French, clever, from Latin cognitus, past participle of cognōscere, to learn; see cognition.]
quaint′ness n.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

quaint

(kweɪnt) adj
1. attractively unusual, esp in an old-fashioned style: a quaint village.
2. odd, peculiar, or inappropriate: a quaint sense of duty.
[C13 (in the sense: clever): from Old French cointe, from Latin cognitus known, from cognoscere to ascertain]
ˈquaintnessn
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

quaint

(kweɪnt)
adj. -er, -est.
1. having an old-fashioned charm; oddly picturesque: a quaint old house.
2. peculiar or unusual in an interesting or amusing way: a quaint sense of humor.
4. Obs. wise; skilled.
[1175–1225; Middle English queinte < Old French, variant of cointe clever, pleasing « Latin cognitus known (past participle of cognōscere; see cognition)]
quaint′ness,n.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
Adj.1.quaint - strange in an interesting or pleasing way; 'quaint dialect words'; 'quaint streets of New Orleans, that most foreign of American cities'
strange, unusual - being definitely out of the ordinary and unexpected; slightly odd or even a bit weird; 'a strange exaltation that was indefinable'; 'a strange fantastical mind'; 'what a strange sense of humor she has'
2.quaint - very strange or unusual; odd or even incongruous in character or appearance; 'the head terminating in the quaint duck bill which gives the animal its vernacular name'- Bill Beatty; 'came forth a quaint and fearful sight'- Sir Walter Scott; 'a quaint sense of humor'
strange, unusual - being definitely out of the ordinary and unexpected; slightly odd or even a bit weird; 'a strange exaltation that was indefinable'; 'a strange fantastical mind'; 'what a strange sense of humor she has'
3.quaint - attractively old-fashioned (but not necessarily authentic); 'houses with quaint thatched roofs'; 'a vaulted roof supporting old-time chimney pots'
fashionable, stylish - being or in accordance with current social fashions; 'fashionable clothing'; 'the fashionable side of town'; 'a fashionable cafe'
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

quaint

adjective
1.unusual, odd, curious, original, strange, bizarre, fantastic, old-fashioned, peculiar, eccentric, queer, rum(Brit. slang), singular, fanciful, whimsical, drollWhen visiting restaurants, be prepared for some quaint customs.
unusualnormal, ordinary
2.old-fashioned, charming, picturesque, antique, gothic, old-world, antiquatedWhisky-making is treated as a quaint cottage industry.
old-fashionednew, modern, fashionable, up-to-date
Collins Thesaurus of the English Language – Complete and Unabridged 2nd Edition. 2002 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995, 2002

quaint

adjective
1. Agreeably curious, especially in an old-fashioned or unusual way:
2. Deviating from the customary:
bizarre, cranky, curious, eccentric, erratic, freakish, idiosyncratic, odd, outlandish, peculiar, queer, quirky, singular, strange, unnatural, unusual, weird.
British Slang: rum, rummy.
The American Heritage® Roget's Thesaurus. Copyright © 2013, 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
se starobylým půvabemstarobylý
sérkennilegur, skemmtilega gamaldags
古風で趣のある
savotiškaisavotiškumas
pittoresk
ilginçtuhaf ve hoş

quaint

[kweɪnt]ADJ (quainter (compar) (quaintest (superl)))
1. (= picturesque) [building, street, village] → pintoresco
2. (= odd) [custom, notion] → curioso; [person] → peculiar, poco corriente
how quaint!¡qué curioso!
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

quaint

[ˈkweɪnt]adj
(= old-fashioned) [word, phrase, concept, idea] → désuet/ète; [charm] → désuet/ète; [custom] → désuet/ète
[cottage, village, shop] → pittoresque
a quaint little cottage → un petitcottagepittoresque
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

quaint

adj (+er)(= picturesque)cottage, village, scenemalerisch, idyllisch; (= charmingly old-fashioned)pub, custom, expressionurig, reizend; (= pleasantly odd)ideakurios, schnurrig, putzig; nicknameoriginell; person, way of speakingdrollig; how quaint to live in such an old housedas ist ja urig, in so einem altenHaus zu wohnen; what a thought, my dear, how quaint!nein so was, meine Liebe, wie originell!
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

quaint

[kweɪnt]adj (-er (comp) (-est (superl))) (odd) → strano/a, bizzarro/a; (picturesque) → pittoresco/a; (old-fashioned) → antiquato/a e pittoresco/a
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

quaint

(kweint) adjective
pleasantly odd or strange, especially because of being old-fashioned. quaint customs. ouwêrelds, sonderling جَذّاب لِقِدَمِه отживял singular se starobylým půvabem wunderlich løjerlig γραφικός, ιδιότυπος raro, singular; pintoresco (vanamoeliselt) veider شگفت انگیز؛ قشنگ vanhanaikainen au charme vieillot מוזר अजीब, अनुठा starinski, čudan furcsa aneh sérkennilegur, skemmtilega gamaldags originale, curioso 風変わりな 진기한, 별난 keistas, savotiškas dīvains; savāds aneh tetapi menarik grappig ouderwetssnodig, kuriøs, gammeldagsosobliwy عجيبه، تماشايى، جلبوونكى singular neobişnuit причудливый starobylý, starodávny starinski starinski lustig, pittoresk, kuriös น่าดึงดูดแบบแปลก ๆ tuhaf ve hoş (尤指因過時而顯得)奇特的,古趣盎然的 привабливий старовиною انوکھا ، قدیم وضع کا kỳ quặc 古怪的,离奇有趣的
ˈquaintly adverb
ouwêreldsagtig بِجاذِبِيَّه لِغَرابَتِه отиживяло singularmente malebně wunderlich løjerligt γραφικά, ιδιότυπα de forma rara/singular; de forma pintoresca omapäraselt بطور جالب viehättävästi d'une façon pittoresque בְּצוּרָה מוּזָרָה अनोखेपन से privlačno jednostavno furcsán secara aneh sérkennilega in maniera originale/curiosa 風変わりに 진기하게 keistai, savotiškai dīvaini; savādi aneh tetapi menarik grappig ouderwetssnodig, kuriøst osobliwie په عجيبه ډول، په جلبوونكى توګه singularmente (în mod) neobişnuit причудливо malebne slikovito starinski lustigt, pittoreskt, kuriöst อย่างฉลาด tuhaf şekilde 古趣盎然地 чудернацьки نادرانہ انداز میں một cách kỳ quặc 古怪地,古雅别致
ˈquaintness noun
ouwêreldsheid, sonderlingheid جاذبِيَّة الشّيء لِقِدَمِه отживелица singularidade půvab starého die Wunderlichkeit løjerlighed γραφικότητα, ιδιοτυπία rareza, singularidad; carácter pintoresco omapära غیر عادی بودن مطلوب vanhanaikaisuus caractère vieillot מוזרות अनोखापन, अनूठापन privlačna jednostavnost fur(cs)aság keanehan það að vera sérkennilegur curiosità, stranezza 風変わり 진기함 keistumas, savotiškumas dīvainība; savādums aneh tetapi menarik grappige ouderwetsheid snodighetosobliwość په عجيبه ډول singularidade ciudăţenie причудливость pôvab starého / starodávneho slikovitost zastarelost lustighet, kuriositet ความฉลาด tuhaflık 古趣盎然 ексцентричність عجوبہ پن tính độc đáo kỳ quặc 古怪,离奇有趣
Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary © 2006-2013 K Dictionaries Ltd.

quaint

طَرِيف starobylý ejendommeligurigιδιόρυθμοςQuaint notion 意思curioso viehättävän erikoinendésuet osebujanpittoresco 古風で趣のある 별나고 아름다운grappig ouderwetspittoreskosobliwyfora do comum, incomum

Quaint Notions

Quaint notion 中文причудливый pittoresk มีเสน่ห์แบบโบราณilginç kỳ lạ离奇有趣的
Multilingual Translator © HarperCollins Publishers 2009

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Quaint Notion 意味